Great Reads for Teens and Tweens!

Helping you make an informed decision about that book

Gym Candy by Carl Deuker

Title: Gym Candy

Author: Carl Deuker

Publisher: Perfection Learning          Year: 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1606863763

Genre: Fiction

Age: 12 and up

Awards: Printz Honor Book Award, a National Book Award nomination, Golden Kite award, the Edgar Allen Poe Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize

Themes / Subjects: Young Adult, High School, Family Life, Sports, Health – Steroids, Friendships, Coming of Age

Plot Summary:

Check out my booktalk trailer I created with goanimate.com!

Gym Candy by Carl Deuker http://goanimate.com/videos/0vXZkYLbVR68

My Take:

I am not a football person at all. When I was in high school marching band and had to go to all the football games, I would hide books in my uniform and read when I wasn’t playing. I watch the Super Bowl every year and even then I fast forward during the game to watch the commercials and half time show. Did I mention I strongly dislike football?

With that said and off my chest, I loved this book! All the football jargon confused me a little bit but honestly it wasn’t overwhelming. The best part was getting to see the darker side of sports. I’ve always heard about professional athletes using steroids on the news and never thought that it would begin as young as freshman in high school. This book in no way encourages the use of steroids and really goes to great length and detail to show just how screwed up Mick’s life became all because he wanted to be the best. Parents who push their children to be star athletes need to read this because I don’t think they realize the consequences their actions can have on their kids. And all kids whether they are pressured to be the best or not should read this book because it will cause them to think twice about trying any sort of drugs.

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars … while I can’t say it has turned me on to being a football fan, this book has caused me to really examine the pressures we put our young athletes under.

Similar read: Boost by Kathryn Mackel. Whereas Deuker explores the use of steroids in male athlets, Mackel takes the readers into the girls locker room for a change.

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The Maze Runner by James Dashner

Title: The Maze Runner

Author: James Dashner

Publisher: Delacorte Press      Year: 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0385737951

Genre: Science Fiction

Age: 12 and up

Awards: YALSA Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers 2011

Themes / Subjects: dystopian society, young adult, fantasy adventure, science fiction, relationships

Plot Summary:

When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his first name everything else is a complete blank. When the lift’s doors open, Thomas finds himself surrounded by kids who welcome him to the Glade a large, open expanse surrounded by stone walls.

Just like Thomas, the Gladers don’t know why or how they got to the Glade. All they know is that every morning the stone doors to the maze that surrounds them open and every night they are closed tight. And every 30 days a new boy has been delivered in the lift.

Thomas was expected. But the next day, a girl is sent up the first girl to ever arrive in the Glade. And more surprising yet is the message she delivers. Thomas might be more important than he could ever guess. If only he could unlock the dark secrets buried within his mind.

My Take:

If you are looking for a great series to read after finishing Suzanne Collin’s Hunger Games Trilogy then this is exactly what you are looking for.

From the very beginning and until the finish, author James Dashner provides barely enough information to answer the questions that form in the reader’s mind but what information he gives does promote one to keep reading. I found myself reading the book in one sitting because I just had to know what was going on and how the story was going to end.

I felt the characters weren’t as well developed as they could have been. Teresa is an extremely important character yet she is just so flat. Thomas was a bit of a disappointment as well and his character really doesn’t develop until almost the end of the book. On the other hand certain secondary characters were so deeply created that they at times had a larger impact on me than the main character.

By the end of the book I was wondering, what was the point of all that? The characters themselves don’t understand why they were put through the horrors they were and one can only hope this is because the author will develop the story I the next two books. The reason I liked this book was because the suspense kept me intrigued. I just had to know why the boys were in the maze and how they were going to escape. I just with it had been more thought provoking and detailed.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars … The plot seemed to drag which dragged out the suspense and not always in a good way. Still a great read.

Similar read: Divergent by Veronica Roth

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King of Pop: The Story of Michael Jackson

Title: King of Pop: The Story of Michael Jackson

Author: Terry Collins

Illustrator: Michael Byers

Publisher: Capstone Press      Year: 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1429679947

Genre: Graphic Novel

Age: 8 – 14 years old

Awards: N/A

Themes / Subjects: Michael Jackson, King of Pop, artist, entertainer, humanitarian, legend

Plot Summary:

In the 1960s, Michael Jackson was just a young boy with big dreams. By the time he died in 2009, Michael had grown to be a music icon and an international legend. Follow Michael’s journey as he spends his last day reminiscing about growing up in the tumultuous music industry and the legacy he would leave behind.

My Take:

What a disappointment! As a library media specialist, I expected more of from this book for my students, although what can you really expect for five bucks? Michael Jackson led such an interesting and complicated life. I’m not saying that we need to tell young people every little detail of every trial or mishap Michael had, but nor should we sugar coat a person’s ENTIRE life. A graphic novel is an excellent way to get young or reluctant readers to read, but let’s make sure we are giving them all the facts. I want to see more about Michael growing up, the charity work he did, how being such a pop icon made him an easy target for accusations, and how a horrible addiction ended his life. I’m not saying it should go into graphic detail, but come on people! There is nothing worse than lying to kids!

Rating: 1 out of five stars. Teens (and I) want the truth! But perhaps in the famous words of Jack Nicholson as Col. Jessep in 1992’s A Few Good Men (fyi, not an appropriate teen/tween movie), You can’t handle the truth!

Similar read: I’m not about to send you guys out to read an equally sucky book so this will have to wait until I come across something similar but much, much better (which shouldn’t be hard).

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